Crossing the Canadian Prairies

We crossed into Manitoba sometime late on Saturday afternoon, and we were headed straight for Winnipeg. If you’ve ever driven into Winnipeg, you know that Manitoba is the start of the prairies, not quite full on prairies but pretty damn close meaning it’s the start of getting really flat. It feels like you can see a couple days in each direction you look. The speed limit also increases from 90 in Northern Ontario to 100, probably the best part of crossing into Manitoba.

On our way to Winnipeg, we crossed 96 degrees 48 minutes and 35 seconds, meaning we made it to the Longitudinal Centre of Canada. At first with the increased speed limit, we drove right past it. We didn’t really know where it was, just that it was somewhere on the way to Winnipeg and there were no signs to prepare us for the stop. Regardless, we took the first turn around and went back for the sign. There was no way I was making it to the heart of Canada and not getting a picture with the sign to prove it. It’s pretty surreal knowing that you have equal amounts of Canada to the West and East, and you’re just in the center of the 2nd largest country on earth.

After Winnipeg, we left for the booming metropolitan of Moose Jaw, Sk. The drive to Moose Jaw was boring, nothing but flatness and wheat fields. There were these small shrubby plants and small trees but not much else. The sky and the land meet together at the horizon and you really get a feeling that the world may be flat after all… Maybe flat-earthers are onto something there. You can decide for yourself with these pictures.

Did I forget to mention the best part of driving the prairies was seeing the massive farm combines harvesting all the wheat? The clouds of dust they put up and the bare ground they leave behind really makes you appreciate how central Canada became known as the breadbasket of Canada.

On our third day, we finally made it to our 3rd province of the trip, Saskatchewan. Getting around in the prairies feels like you’re just driving and driving… It is very “dull” in the prairies; there is nothing that really keeps your attention. However, when you get closer to the heart of the prairies, the speed limit goes up again to 110 km/h. I guess police realized that you can see for two days into the distance, and allowed for people to get there a little faster. Fine by me.

The only cool thing we saw on day 4 (while still in the prairies) was this massive valley out of nowhere, with a lake covering the whole bottom. A road/bridge went right through the middle of the lake. It was a random hidden gem in Saskatchewan.

Our plan was to hightail it from Moose Jaw all the way to Jasper National Park, to the start of the Rocky Mountains. It took longer than we thought to cover so much ground but eventually, we made it into Alberta. We started to see glimpses of the mountains, but the Rockies deserve their own post.

But I can’t just leave you hanging, so here’s a view from our first night in the Rockies.

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